Valentina Karga

PROJECTS

La fermentation de la terre

2018-08-10

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

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And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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The Institute for Spontaneous Generation

2017-08-23

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Hot Stuff mini – Holidays version

2017-08-23

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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OUR COMING COMMUNITY

2017-02-11

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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HOT STUFF

2016-12-13

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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A residency on Planet B

2016-07-26

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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The gigantic Jelly-Blob

2016-07-26

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Market for Immaterial Value

2016-07-26

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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The Agar Banquet: a gel-related credit system

2015-10-18

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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The construction of fire and other stories

2015-02-05

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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30 days in the garden / 15 days on Mars

2014-10-23

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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projects summary

2014-07-11

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Saturnalia

2014-07-07

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Exercises in Walking and Talking

2014-06-04

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Temple of Holy Shit

2014-02-27

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Valentina and Pieter invest in themselves

2013-11-15

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Summer school for applied Autonomy

2013-09-04

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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Self-sufficiency in the era of the new Commons

2013-09-03

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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30 days in the garden/ 15 days on Mars : the publication

2013-02-22

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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this ever-whirling engine

2012-10-26

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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The super rocket-stove cook off

2012-09-14

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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the institute of placemaking

2012-05-12

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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machine for sustainable living

2011-06-02

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

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And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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small catastrophe enchiridion

2010-11-19

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When Tessa Zettel and myself arrived for a collaborative residency in the South of France, at independent artspace Treignac Projet, we set to explore our shared fascination with processes of fermentation.  La fermentation de la terre is the result of our exploration, a homage to fermentation, and was part of the exhibition Entanglements, Embodiments, Positions, curated by Jussi Koitela.

For early societies, the transformation of basic food materials into fermented foods was a mystery and a miracle, for they had no idea what caused the usually sudden, dramatic, and welcomed transformation. The Ancient Greeks believed that living things could spontaneously come into being from nonliving matter, and that the goddess Gaia could make life arise spontaneously from stones – a process known as Generatio spontanea. 

With the development of chemistry as a science, chemists believed that fermentation was a process of death, not life. However, in 1857 Pasteur showed that lactic acid fermentation is caused by living organisms : and the ancient theory of spontaneous generation of lower life forms, was replaced by the verifiable theory of biogenesis. For the first time people began to accept the fact that they shared their environment with multitudes of minute organisms that exerted an ongoing powerful influence on human life.

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 06.34.05

And as all changes in the collective mentality are not as peaceful, Pasteur’s discovery aroused fierce criticism of the scientific community of the day. This view seemed to give new life to the waning mystical philosophy of vitalism, which they had worked so hard to defeat.

Over a one-week residency, we experimented with techniques for making beetroot and carrot pickle (incorporating the beetroot stalks and leaves), a French variant of kimchi (with chilli, ginger and herbs from the garden, thyme, rosemary, dill..), and pickled eggs, all in ceramic vessels that could be buried in the earth.  Unable to find a suitable burial pit on the property, with topsoil in this region being very thin, Sam & Liz (who run the space) decided that they needed to make one, so Sam set to drilling out a patch of concrete in the courtyard. Valentina and Tessa tried out some underground slow-cooking in the new hole, and left behind a pit that can now be used for future fermentations.

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